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July 13, 2017     Lovell Chronicle
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July 13, 2017
 

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t 6 1 The Lovell Chronicle I July 13, 2017 HIGHWAY AND BRIDGE PROJECT BEGINS the bridge and highway construction work will be conducted to the east of the current highway north of the Cannery Road. The only delays will take place when equipment is moving on or off the highway for dirt or material hauling, he said. Initial work includes continued from page one been tentatively scheduled for 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon- day through Friday. Some Working Saturdays are planned, as well. Greater delays will take place next year when the highway widening west of Lovell begins, Miller said. "Next spring theyll start milling the road and fencing as well as grubbing start work on widening the and clearing of dirt and road ' he said. "That will at- vegetation alongside the fect traffic more next year. existing roadway, according Paving is scheduled to be to WyDOT, and bridge work done by the fall of 2018." will continue until weather The prime contrac- brings a winter shutdown, tor on the project is S&S "The contractor, for the Builders of Gillette, a bridge most part, will be work- constructioncompany, ing off the existing roadway through 2017, and traffic will remain on the exist- ing road alignment until the summer of 2018;' Miller said in the recentpress re- lease. "Minor traffic delays should be expected during working hours, and two- way traffic will be main- tained after working hours are complete for the day: Working hours have Miller said. The Wyoming Transportation Commis- sion awarded the bid to S&S Builders on May 18. The fi- nal contract completion date is June 30, 2019. Miller also pointed out that the Shoshone Munic- ipal Pipeline will also be moving due to the highway widening project, and that work will be done by March or April of 2018. NBHH CEO REFELCTS ON HEALTH CARE LAW continued from page one lion were to go into effect first dollars covering medi- without amendments, cal expenses coming direct- In his report, Reid- ly out of the pockets of con- head revealed several key sumers. Schroederadmitted findings. He noted that the that, though the hospital BRCA of 2017, as proposed, district's bottom line has would cut federal spending been affected by delayed on Medicaid by $772 billion payments and write-offs between 2017 and 2026, re- due to non-payment, it con- sulting in an estimated 15 tinues to focus on creating million fewer Americans en- programs to help patients rolled in the program. He struggling to pay their bills. estimated that an additional "There are many in our 8113.6 billion in federal Med- community and across the icaid funding would flow to country who don't have in- expansion states that re- surance who still pay their ceive 81,578 per capital in bills ' said Schroeder. "This net federal dollars com- pared to $753 per capita to non-expansion states, a dif- ference of 61 percent. In its June 30 newslet- ter, the Wyoming Hospital Association listed its con- cerns about how the BCRA, as currently written, would is especially true in our community. That's why we're working very hard to develop payment plans for them. We're trying to make it easier for people to man- age their health care needs." The district recently implemented Care Credit, a affect patients and hospitals program designed to pro- in Wyo sting : e cases, lth intenD .l tAer ts her- one ,with unex' "The two main objec- pectred medical bills. It is tions to the Senate bill are also working on a discount deep cuts to Medicaid and program that would cater to cuts to health insurance patients who are either un- subsidies ' the article noted, insured or who maintain in- "The Senate bill inflicts dev- surance policies with very astating cuts to Medicaid, high deductibles. resulting in the loss of coy- In the meantime, the erage for tens of millions of hospital continues to treat our most vulnerable, partic- patients, irrespective of ularly children, the elderly their ability to pay, in its and disabled." emergency room and out- The article also stated patient clinic, as well as ad- that the bill will shift signifi- vising patients of any pro- cant out-of-pocket costs to grams that may help them patients and will be espe- with cost. cially devastating to low-in- The, Emergency Med- come patients who are un- ical Treatment and La- able to afford co pays and bor Act (EMTALA), a feder- deductibles that would be al law that requires anyone required under the bill. coming to an emergency It also noted that age will department to be stabilized again be a factor in cost, and treated, regardless of with the cost of insurance their ability to pay, is strict- rising as much as five times ly enforced. Additionally, the amount currently man- NBHH offers a sliding scale dated for the pre-Medicare and other payment plans for eligible 60-64-year old age patients who cannot afford group, to pay for clinic visits at the Schroeder noted that time of service or in a time- with deductibles escalating ly manner. Schroeder said over time, and high month- the plans allow patients to ly insurance payments un- get the care they need when der the current health care they need it in the most law, for some with insur- economical way, since clinic ance it's almost like not hav- visits are far less expensive ing insurance at all, with the than emergency room visits. Morrison retires after 31 years in the classroom BY PATTI CARPENTER Teacher Linda Morri- son retired at the end of the school year after more than 30 years of turning on young minds in Big Horn County School District No. 2. Morrison served the stu- dents at Lovell Elementa- ry School for most of her teaching career, except for one year teaching in Cow- ley and several years she took off to raise her chil- dren. Morrison earned her early childhood education degree at Brigham Young University in 1975. As a beginning teach- er, Morrison landed her first job in the education- al field as a teaching assis- tant at LES, after moving to the area with her husband Bruce. That job later led to teaching at various grade levels, before she settled in as a first-grade teacher for 17 years, where she said she loved every minute of the experience. "The thing about this grade level is that they come in with a knowl- edge base and just grasp so much more in that yeari' said Morrison. "They are so excited about everything. They are the best." Morrison specialized in teaching reading and was trained as a "reading re- covery" teacher early in her career. She said slae was honored to be part of the p^Tr C pE rER program, which she feels Linda Morrison retired after more than 30 years in the is very important in the Lover Elementary School classroom. district. "The reading recov- terence in our district over first-grader to do." ery program is a method of those years." Morrison is fondly re- teaching struggling read- Morrison said one ofmembered by many former ers the methods that good the most rewarding mo- students for her introduc- readers use," explainedments of her career waslion of the fictional charac- Morrison, adding that it has when she received a hand- ter Tigger in her classroom. continued to be an import- written note from one of She described herself as ant part of the school's cur- her students that read,"kind of a theme person" riculum for about 20 years. "Thank you for helping me and employed the charac- "One of the reasons it has learn." ter from the classic Win- been so successful here is"It just doesn't getnie-the-Pooh story to cre- that we got on board with it any better than that,' said ate an atmosphere that was and stayed with it. I think it Morrison. "That's a pret- fun, comfortable and con- really has made a huge dif- ty incredible thing for a ducive to learning. She said Tigger was a logical choice because she had grown up with a Tiger mascot in her high school in Idaho Falls and at one point even was the mascot. "In high school, we were the Tigers and I was the mascot ' she explained. ',That had been my goal all my life to be the mascot, so when I got that opportunity it was special to me. "When Tigger came out later (and popularized by Disney movies), it just made sense that he would be my guy in the classroom. The 100-acre woods and all those characters were just good friends and that's how I wanted my classroom to be - a friendly place, a place where kids could be happy and they could bloom and have success:' Over the years Morri- son received many stuffed Tiggers as gifts. She even donned a Tig,ger costume at the schools Halloween celebration for many years. "It took me two years to give all of my (stuffed) Tig- gers away. I literally gave a Tigger to every one of my kids for two years, she said. Morrison said she wore her Tigger costume for years and was unable to change to something else because everyone asked her to wear the costume again. She still owns the costume. As with most retiring teachers, early summer is too early to miss the class- room, though she imagines it will be a little strange not to go back when school be- gins in August. "You realize when its time and when I turned 65 I knew it was time;' said Morrison. "I have lots of in- terests that will keep me busy and it just seems like the right time to do that" Morrison said she plans to travel and spend more time with family. From our files 25 Years Ago, July 9, 1992 The Lovell Chronicle A 15-year-old Lovell boy is on a donor list awaiting a new heart after doctors in Salt Lake City determined this week that his heart is enlarged and not function- ing properly. Ryan Martens, son of Bob and Elsie Mar- tens, began feeling ill be- fore Mustang Days. He was weak, not eating well and was losing weight. Ryan survived a life-threatening bout with cancer as a tod- dler, and drugs used to fight the cancer may be a factor in his heart condition, it is thought. The Martens fami- P.o ly has arranged for an apart- This truck and backhoe flipped over two miles west of Lovell 50 yearsago this week. ment in Salt Lake, and Ryan Fortunately, the young drive escaped injury. See the 1967 listing below. will remain there with his mother, Elsie, until a quali- two miles west of Lovell Croft company. The new lo- pany has closed its facto- fled donor heart is found, when his brakes failed. He cation has 3,250 square feet ry, Lovell, temporarily after 50 Years Ago, July 13, 1967 tried to make the turn north additional shopping space, a run of eighteen weeks, The Lovell Chronicle to Cowley and the truckIn remodeling the build- during which approximate- Pic: Major damage was rolled over on U.S, 310, pres- ing for the Penney store, ly 30,000 boxes of window sustained by this truck and ently under construction, the bank spared no effort to glass were manufactured. 75 Years Ago, July 16, 1942 make it completely conve- Experiments are being The Lovell Chroniclenient and comfortable - an made on the manufacture backhoe tractor owned by Louis B. Welch Construc- tion Company about 4 p.m. last Wednesday. Driver of the truck, Fred Miller, 19, of Lovell escaped injury. Miller was approaching the junc- tion of U.S. 310 and U.S. 14A The Lovell J.C. Penney store will open Thursday morning at 9 a.m. in its new location in the First Nation- al Bank building, which was recently vacated by the J.P. up-to-date shopping center of glass jars and a small- for local customers, er furnace may be built to 90 Years Ago, July 15, 1927 handle them. Installation of The Cowley Progress machinery, which will im- The Salem Coopera- prove the grade of glass, will live Window Glass Com- be made. North Hom Senior C/t/,-,ens rvice District Horn County. F'lr Distri 't #1 North Hom Hospital District NOTICE OF HEARING NORTH BIG HORN SENIOR CITIZENS SERVICE DISTRICT NOTICE OF HEARING BIG HORN COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT #1 NOTICE OF HEARING NORTH BIG HORN HOSPITAL DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that a public hearing on the proposed budget for North Big Horn Senior Citizens Service District for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018, which is now being considered by the Board of the North Big Horn Senior Citizens Service District, will be held at 757 Great Western, Lovell, Wyoming, on the 20th day of July 2017, at 1:00 oWclock, at which time any and all persons interested may .appear and be heard respecting such budget. A summary of such proposed budget follows: Summary of Budget Estimated Total EstimatedTotal EstimateofTax EstimateofTax Cash & Revenues Budget Requirements Requirements Amount Mill Levy General Fund 5160,000.001 Details of the North Big Hom Senior Citizens Service District general fund requirements Tentative Administration 50.00 Operations 5160,000.00 Indirect Costs $0.00 Capital Outlay $0.00 Debt Service $0.00 Provisions for Tax Shrinkage $0.00 Total Cash Requirements 5160,000.00 Publish: July 13, 2017 Notice is hereby given that a public hearing on the proposed bud- get for Big Horn County Fire District #1 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018, which is now being considered by the Board of Said District, will be held at 314 Nevada Ave., Lovell, Wyoming, on the 20th day of July 2017, at 7:00 p.m. oWclock, at which time any and all persons inter- ested may appear and be heard respecting such budget. A summary of such proposed budget follows: Summary of Budget Estimated Total Estimated Total Estimate of Tax Estimate of Tax Cash & Revenues Budget Requirements Requirements ............................................................................................ Amou_nt ................ ........................ General Fund ....... =$.2.18,8~ ............ $45.5.~5.5.0:~ ................. $2~,_~.~ ...................... 2:.5 .................... Details of the Big Horn County Fire District #1 general fund requirements Tentative Administration $4,850.00 Operations S253,000.00 Indirect Costs $44,700.00 Capital Outlay $153,000.00 Debt Service Provisions for Tax Shrinkage Total Cash Requirements $455,550.00 Publish: July 13, 2017 Notice is hereby given that a public hearing on the proposed bud- get for North Big Horn Hospital District for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2018, which is now being considered by the Board of the North Big Horn Hospital District, will be held at Lovell, Wyoming, on the 18th day of July 2017, at 5:30 p.m., at which time any and all persons interested may appear and be heard respecting such budget. A summary of such proposed budget follows: Summary of Budget Estimated Total Estimated Total Estimate of Tax Estimate of Tax Cash & Revenues Budget Requirements Requirements ................................................................... A.m.o~nt. ......................... _M..!!! Lev~_ ..... General Fund ...... $29~309,6.27.00 $.!9~03.6,75.Z00 ............... $8()0~0q0~01) .................... 6_ ............... Details of the North Big Horn Hospital District general fund requirements Tentative Administration 51,463,628.00 Operations 516,759,088.00 Indirect Costs Capital Costs $850,000.00 Debt Service Provisions for Tax Shrinkage Total Cash Requirements 519,072,716.00 Publish: July 13, 2017