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August 16, 2012     Lovell Chronicle
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August 16, 2012 I The Lovell Chronicle I 13 District No. Two students score well on PAWS BY PATTI CARPENTER The Big Horn County District No. 2 school board caught a glimpse of stu- dent performance at their regularly held school board meeting on Monday night. Curriculum Director Nancy Cerroni presented an over- view of PAWS scores for all grade levels tested within the district. "Overall, students did really well," said District No. 2 Supt. Dan Coe. "We are pleased with the re- sults." PAWS is a state test re- quiring reading and math to be tested in grades 3 through 8 and grade 11. Science is tested in grades 4, 8 and 11. Most grade levels in the district tested at or above the state average. Grades 6, 7 and 8 tested slightly below the state average in reading but tested at or above state averages in math and sci- ence. "Improvements in read- ing is always a goal," said Cerroni. "There is a heavy focus on this skill in our curriculum based on com- mon core standards." READING Third graders tested at 84 percent proficient in reading, which is well above the state average of 69 per- cent. Fourth graders tested at 95 percent compared to the statewide average of 80 percent. Fifth graders test- ed at 85 percent compared to the statewide average of 79 percent. Sixth graders fell slightly below the state average at 78 percent com- pared to a state average of 82 percent for their grade level. Seventh graders were 68 percent proficient com- pared to the state average of 76 percent. Eighth graders scored 74 percent proficient compared to a statewide av- erage of 78 percent for their, grade level. Eleventh grad- ers scored very high at 92 percent proficiency com- pared to the state average of 78 percent. Overall, the combined scores for the district totaling 82 percent were five percentage points higher than the state aver- age, which is 77 percent. A comparison of the reading scores over a five- year period painted a pic- ture of steady progress to- ward a goal of 100 percent proficiency. The elementary school students showed an increase in their proficiency in reading from 74 percent in the 2007-08 school year to 88 percent in 2011-12. The middle school stu- dents tested increased their proficiency overall scor- ing 73 percent proficient in the 2011-12 school year compared to their score of 67 percent five years ago. However, they did experi- ence a slight dip in perfor- mance, scoring five percent- age points lower in reading than they did the previous year. The high school stu- dents tested showed the most dramatic increase in performance from 49 per- cent proficiency in the school year 2007-08 to a rel- atively high score of 92 per- cent proficiency in the lat- est round of tests. MATH The district as a whole scored very high in math compared to the state with a combined score of 89 per- cent proficiency compared to the state average of 79 per- cent. Third graders scored 100 percent compared to a statewide average of 90 per- cent. Fourth graders scored 91 percent compared to a 82 percent compared to the state average of 63 percent for their grade level. Eighth graders scored 62 percent proficient compared to the state average of 53 percent and llth graders scored 73 "If we can think of PAWS as no different than a measurement tool like a thermometer or a yardstick that is intended to measure school performance in relation to a set of standards, we can use this tool to see if we&apos;ve met the goals of our school improvement plan." - Curriculum Director Nancy Cerroni statewide average of 82 per- cent. Fifth graders scored 89 percent compared to a statewide score of 83 per- cent. Sixth graders were right at state average with a score of 80 percent. Sev- enth graders scored well at 94 percent compared to state average of 79 percent for their grade level. Eighth graders also scored rela- tively well with a percent of 86 percent compared to the state average of 74 percent. Eleventh graders scored 86 percent compared to the state average of 66 percent. Overall the district scored a full 10 points higher than the statewide average of 79 percent proficiency in math- ematics. SCIENCE The three grade levels tested in science scored well above the state average at 72 percent compared to the statewide average of 56 per- cent. Fourth graders scored percent compared to the state average of 51 percent. Overall the district scores when combined showed an increase in pro- ficiency in science from 45 percent to 72 percent over a five-year period. The high school students tested showed a slight dip in per- formance of two percentage points over the previous year. While the elementary and middle school students showed steady increase in proficiency in science over the five-year period. "We have all of the in- gredients for success in our district," said Cerroni. "We have good family involve- ment, community support and the hard work of our students, and it shows in the scores." Cerroni pointed out that PAWS is only one test measure the students par- ticipate in over the school year. "We look at all of the data from several forms of testing to analyze how our students are doing," said Cerroni. "Any time you take a test result in isolation, you are doing somebody an in- credible disservice because it is only part of an overall assessment package." PAWS is the statewide test mandated by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) federal law. The test is ad- ministered once a year, usually in March over a two-week period of time. "We belong to the Ad- vancEd school improve- ment process," explained Cerroni. "We are accred- ited through this process. As a part of the process we are required to do a district and school improvement plan and the plan has to be based on measurable re- sults and that is one of the ways we use PAWS. So, if we can think of PAWS as no different than a measure- ment tool like a thermom- eter or a yardstick that is intended to measure school performance in relation to a set of standards, we can use this tool to see if we've met the goals of our school im- provement plan." Cerroni will continue to analyze PAWS results at the next school board meet- ing, which will be held on Sept. 10. All school board meetings are open to the public. In other matters, Coe announced that full accred- itation has been bestowed on the district through the AdvancEd process. "It takes a lot of work to receive full accreditation," said Coe, who congratulat- ed all of the administrators who were present at the meeting. Coe also gave the board an update on how the high school remodel is progressing holding up a one-inch thick document recently signed by the SFD as an example of how complicated the process has been. "This is why it took four months," said Coe, holding up the contract. Cerroni noted that AYP results (an acronym for Ade- quate Yearly Progress) have not been received yet and she will be reviewing those results with the board at the next meeting. AYP is a mea- surement of how students perform according to bench- marks created under the fed- eral NCLB standards law. In personnel matters, the board formally approved several assistant coaches and accepted recommenda- tion for two staff positions. The coaches included: LHS assistant volleyball coach Mykel Anderson, LHS as- sistant football coach Craig Lundberg and LMS assis- tant football coaches Mike Jameson and Wil Zollman. Stacey O'Tremba was approved by the board for the position of Tier Two Co- ordinator and will report directly to Cerroni. Sabrea Hauge was approved for the position of special edu- cation paraprofessional at Lovell Elementary School. The board also dis- cussed a special teacher evaluation system they are piloting as part of a state program. Board chairwom- an Judy Richards noted that several board members and administrators were impressed with the system after attending a "learning session" about it recently. 0 )en 24 hours, 7 days a week Stop in and ask about memberships, get o tour of our facility Mon.-Thurs., 4:30-6:30 p.m. or coil 548-2639 for more information. Ross B. Fuller, DC Palmer Graduate Call Stormy, 548-2217, to advertise your business in our local business guide Cme0eeaeriC Back/Neck Pain - Sports Injuries Nutrition Counseling * Antioxidant Testing Weight Loss 307-548-9338 223 E. 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