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8 I The Lovell Chronicle I September 30, 2010 www.LovellChronicle.com Sharon Hall and daughter Natalie Hall were among the health fair attendees who wandered out to the classic car show in the parking lot of the Lovell Community Center. The truck pictured is a 1949 restored to its former glory along with a few modern touches like power windows. BRAD DEWVX BARRASSO "It's good to hear what they have to say," he said. Coming to events like the health fair has been a priority for the sena- tor since he was elected to office. "It means you're Wyoming and you're not one of those people back in Washington," he said. Touching on the national health care plan, some of which went into effect on Thursday, Sept. 23, Barras- so said he is not happy with the leg- islation that was passed. "I think it's going to be bad all around for patients and providers," Continued from page 1 Barrasso said, adding, "The taxpay- ers are going to take a big hit." Barrasso announced Sept. 22 he was selected Vice Chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, the number five Republican Party lead- ership post in the Senate. The late Sen. Clif Hansen held the same po- sition in the 1970s, Barrasso said. Barrasso said he was still getting acclimated to the new post Saturday and didn't comment on the respon- sibilities that come with the post, but said, "I think it will be a good opportunity to have an impact for Wyoming and the Rocky Mountain West. "We have a lot to accomplish for the American people," Barrasso said in a statement released last week about the new post. "We must end wasteful Washington spending, stop flawed economic policies, make it easier for the private sector to create jobs and secure a successful future for our country. "This team is ready. The Amer- ican people are clearly ready. I'm looking forward to the hard work and the challenges ahead of us." BYRON SCHOOL security, and the business plan. Cook said he has dealt with Medi- care and Medicaid at his current men- tal health agency job and his funding has "some wiggle room" to deal with the ebb and flow of Medicare/Medic- aid payments. The majority of peo- ple at the facility are expected to be court ordered, but Positive Progres- sions will also be able to bill insur- ance companies for private individu- als who use their services. Cook said his business plan has been looked over by his private investor, the school committee, Linda Harp and several others. Cook said he would be tl busi- ness' CEO and handle the upper lev- el management hiring. As for security, Cook said the fa- cility won't be taking violent offend- ers and sex offenders and the facil- ity won't need a chain-link fence or guards. After discussing the issue for 1 1/2 hours in executive session, the board reconvened in an open session to offer leasing options on the district property to Cook. Crosby made a motion to grant Continued from page 1 the title of the home economics cot- tage to the Town of Byron in a first right of refusal agreement and to ne- gotiate a longterm lease with Posi- tive Progressions for the shop and green space (football field). Board chairman Dave Monk ex- plained to Cook that the district can- not give district property away for free but they would work with Cook to negotiate a lease agreement for the property. Crosby asked Cook why he needs to own the property to move forward. Cook said he doesn't want to invest a lot of money in construction if he doesn't own the land the building(s) sit on. "I'm not interested at all going that route," Cook said about leasing the property from the district. George brought up the idea of the district selling the property to the Town of Byron, which would then lease it to Cook. He said this idea would be favorable because then the town could help by writing grants and possibly utilizing town employees to help with maintenance and other work. George asked if the district would consider selling the land, either to the town or to Cook. Monk said the board would look at an unsolicited offer for any district property. Cook said he needs to move quick- ly on the project, hoping to break ground in as soon as two weeks to beat the frost. Board members said the School Facilities Commision has final say on the matter, and the SFC might take longer than two weeks to ap- prove the transfer of district prop- erty. Cook told the board he needs to make a move and if he Cannot work out a deal with the school district to have the business in Byron, he would purchase land and build in Powell. "Our first choice is Byron. We would love to be in Byron," Cook said. "But we have to go to Powell if we can't make it go. We just have to move." The meeting ended without an agreement, with the possibility of Cook or the Town of Byron submit- ting an offer to the district for the property. Public acquires last piece of Devil's Canyon Ranch The Bureau of Land Management has acquired the final piece of the Devil's Canyon Ranch in the Big Horn Mountains to improve public access in the area, the BLM and The Trust for Public Land, announced this week. The BLM will add the 2,969-acre parcel to land it acquired earlier from TPL near Little Mountain, about 15 miles east of Lovell. The property will be managed as part of the Craig Thom- as Little Mountain Special Management Area, which is named after the late Sen. Craig Thomas (R-Wyo.), who was a strong supporter of the project. "We are so pleased that this final piece of the acqui- sition will now be complete," said BLM Cody Field Man- ager Mike Stewart. "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the natural and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." TPL Project Manager Alex Diekmann said, "Fi- nally, we have ended one of the longest and most con- tentious fights over pub- lic access in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Devil's Canyon Ranch is a spectac- ular place and we are proud to have helped protect it for the public to enjoy." TPL acquired the ll,179-acre Devil's Canyon Ranch in 2003 and imme- diately sold 8,200 acres to BLM. The final sale com- pleted the transfer of the land to BLM, at a cost of $2 million. The money came from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), the federal gov- ernment's primary fund for preserving lands across the nation. The appraised fair market value for the 2,969 acres was $3.4 million. Blake Henning, Vice President of Lands and Conservation for the Rocky Mountain Elk Founda- tion, which contributed $100,000 in 2003 to help with the original acquisi- "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the natural and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." - BLM Cody Field Manager Mike Stewart tion, said, "RMEF is proud to have been a supporter and partner in this impor- tant conservation project in Wyoming. The access com- ponent as well as the tre- mendous wildlife benefits secured through this proj- ect will benefit future gen- erations of hunters and out- door recreationists." The Devil's Canyon Ranch had been entirely surrounded by public land, including the Medicine Wheel National Histor- ic Landmark, the Bighorn National Forest, and the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Aea. Today's announcement ended a long dispute over access to more than 20,000 acres of state, BLM and Na- tional Forest lands, which are used by sportsmen and outdoor enthusiasts. A road closure in 1998 blocked ac- cess, but the issue ended up in a federal court. Big Horn County Commission- ers sued the ranch owners to gain access to the prop- erty, bill tJltimately 10st th case, leaving lublic acquisi- tion of the ranch as the only workable solution. TPL is a national non- profit organization that conserves land for people to enjoy as parks, wilderness, and playgrounds. Since it was created in 1972, TPL has conserved more than 2.5 million acres in 47 states. TPL has Montana offices in Bozeman and Helena. Welcome back Come on down to Ladies Night at the Hen House Saturday, October 2[ Special Deals in EVERY Department all day long[ Tie Goodies served from 4-8 pm Free Sift with your purchase[ Hen House ... a great place for chicks 210 E. Main, lovell 548-2077 Open Tues,- Sat., 10am-7 pm That's you! Discover a brand new you at 65. Do more things and go more places than ever before. But don't forget your Blue! We have a Medicare Supplement plan that's right for you. Make Sure You've Got Blue ................................................................. t ex.pertS at Ca, our e dcar e Suyp2;;; :i, ' orBVsit our oca ce Learn more at www.WyomingBlue.com 8 I The Lovell Chronicle I September 30, 2010 www.LovellChronicle.com Sharon Hall and daughter Natalie Hall were among the health fair attendees who wandered out to the classic car show in the parking lot of the Lovell Community Center. The truck pictured is a 1949 restored to its former glory along with a few modern touches like power windows. BRAD DEWVX BARRASSO "It's good to hear what they have to say," he said. Coming to events like the health fair has been a priority for the sena- tor since he was elected to office. "It means you're Wyoming and you're not one of those people back in Washington," he said. Touching on the national health care plan, some of which went into effect on Thursday, Sept. 23, Barras- so said he is not happy with the leg- islation that was passed. "I think it's going to be bad all around for patients and providers," Continued from page 1 Barrasso said, adding, "The taxpay- ers are going to take a big hit." Barrasso announced Sept. 22 he was selected Vice Chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, the number five Republican Party lead- ership post in the Senate. The late Sen. Clif Hansen held the same po- sition in the 1970s, Barrasso said. Barrasso said he was still getting acclimated to the new post Saturday and didn't comment on the respon- sibilities that come with the post, but said, "I think it will be a good opportunity to have an impact for Wyoming and the Rocky Mountain West. "We have a lot to accomplish for the American people," Barrasso said in a statement released last week about the new post. "We must end wasteful Washington spending, stop flawed economic policies, make it easier for the private sector to create jobs and secure a successful future for our country. "This team is ready. The Amer- ican people are clearly ready. I'm looking forward to the hard work and the challenges ahead of us." BYRON SCHOOL security, and the business plan. Cook said he has dealt with Medi- care and Medicaid at his current men- tal health agency job and his funding has "some wiggle room" to deal with the ebb and flow of Medicare/Medic- aid payments. The majority of peo- ple at the facility are expected to be court ordered, but Positive Progres- sions will also be able to bill insur- ance companies for private individu- als who use their services. Cook said his business plan has been looked over by his private investor, the school committee, Linda Harp and several others. Cook said he would be tl busi- ness' CEO and handle the upper lev- el management hiring. As for security, Cook said the fa- cility won't be taking violent offend- ers and sex offenders and the facil- ity won't need a chain-link fence or guards. After discussing the issue for 1 1/2 hours in executive session, the board reconvened in an open session to offer leasing options on the district property to Cook. Crosby made a motion to grant Continued from page 1 the title of the home economics cot- tage to the Town of Byron in a first right of refusal agreement and to ne- gotiate a longterm lease with Posi- tive Progressions for the shop and green space (football field). Board chairman Dave Monk ex- plained to Cook that the district can- not give district property away for free but they would work with Cook to negotiate a lease agreement for the property. Crosby asked Cook why he needs to own the property to move forward. Cook said he doesn't want to invest a lot of money in construction if he doesn't own the land the building(s) sit on. "I'm not interested at all going that route," Cook said about leasing the property from the district. George brought up the idea of the district selling the property to the Town of Byron, which would then lease it to Cook. He said this idea would be favorable because then the town could help by writing grants and possibly utilizing town employees to help with maintenance and other work. George asked if the district would consider selling the land, either to the town or to Cook. Monk said the board would look at an unsolicited offer for any district property. Cook said he needs to move quick- ly on the project, hoping to break ground in as soon as two weeks to beat the frost. Board members said the School Facilities Commision has final say on the matter, and the SFC might take longer than two weeks to ap- prove the transfer of district prop- erty. Cook told the board he needs to make a move and if he Cannot work out a deal with the school district to have the business in Byron, he would purchase land and build in Powell. "Our first choice is Byron. We would love to be in Byron," Cook said. "But we have to go to Powell if we can't make it go. We just have to move." The meeting ended without an agreement, with the possibility of Cook or the Town of Byron submit- ting an offer to the district for the property. Public acquires last piece of Devil's Canyon Ranch The Bureau of Land Management has acquired the final piece of the Devil's Canyon Ranch in the Big Horn Mountains to improve public access in the area, the BLM and The Trust for Public Land, announced this week. The BLM will add the 2,969-acre parcel to land it acquired earlier from TPL near Little Mountain, about 15 miles east of Lovell. The property will be managed as part of the Craig Thom- as Little Mountain Special Management Area, which is named after the late Sen. Craig Thomas (R-Wyo.), who was a strong supporter of the project. "We are so pleased that this final piece of the acqui- sition will now be complete," said BLM Cody Field Man- ager Mike Stewart. "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the natural and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." TPL Project Manager Alex Diekmann said, "Fi- nally, we have ended one of the longest and most con- tentious fights over pub- lic access in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Devil's Canyon Ranch is a spectac- ular place and we are proud to have helped protect it for the public to enjoy." TPL acquired the ll,179-acre Devil's Canyon Ranch in 2003 and imme- diately sold 8,200 acres to BLM. The final sale com- pleted the transfer of the land to BLM, at a cost of $2 million. The money came from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), the federal gov- ernment's primary fund for preserving lands across the nation. The appraised fair market value for the 2,969 acres was $3.4 million. Blake Henning, Vice President of Lands and Conservation for the Rocky Mountain Elk Founda- tion, which contributed $100,000 in 2003 to help with the original acquisi- "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the natural and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." - BLM Cody Field Manager Mike Stewart tion, said, "RMEF is proud to have been a supporter and partner in this impor- tant conservation project in Wyoming. The access com- ponent as well as the tre- mendous wildlife benefits secured through this proj- ect will benefit future gen- erations of hunters and out- door recreationists." The Devil's Canyon Ranch had been entirely surrounded by public land, including the Medicine Wheel National Histor- ic Landmark, the Bighorn National Forest, and the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Aea. Today's announcement ended a long dispute over access to more than 20,000 acres of state, BLM and Na- tional Forest lands, which are used by sportsmen and outdoor enthusiasts. A road closure in 1998 blocked ac- cess, but the issue ended up in a federal court. Big Horn County Commission- ers sued the ranch owners to gain access to the prop- erty, bill tJltimately 10st th case, leaving lublic acquisi- tion of the ranch as the only workable solution. TPL is a national non- profit organization that conserves land for people to enjoy as parks, wilderness, and playgrounds. Since it was created in 1972, TPL has conserved more than 2.5 million acres in 47 states. TPL has Montana offices in Bozeman and Helena. Welcome back Come on down to Ladies Night at the Hen House Saturday, October 2[ Special Deals in EVERY Department all day long[ Tie Goodies served from 4-8 pm Free Sift with your purchase[ Hen House ... a great place for chicks 210 E. Main, lovell 548-2077 Open Tues,- Sat., 10am-7 pm That's you! Discover a brand new you at 65. Do more things and go more places than ever before. But don't forget your Blue! We have a Medicare Supplement plan that's right for you. Make Sure You've Got Blue ................................................................. t ex.pertS at Ca, our e dcar e Suyp2;;; :i, ' orBVsit our oca ce Learn more at www.WyomingBlue.com 8 I The Love. Chronicle I September 30, 2010 W'WW.LoveflChronicle.corn Sharon Hall and daughter Natalie Hall were among the health fair attendees who wandered out to the classic ear show in the parking lot of the Lovell Community Center. The truck pictured is a 1949 restored to its former glory along with a few modern touches like power windows. BARRASSO =It's good to hear what they have to say," he said. Coming to events like the health fair has been a priority for the sena- tor since he was elected to office. =It means you're Wyoming and you're not one of those people back in Washington," he said. Touching on the national health care plan, some of which went into effect on Thursday, Sept. 23, Barras- so said he is not happy with the leg- islation that was passed. =I think it's going to be bad all around for patients and providers," Continued from page 1 Barrasso said, adding, =The taxpay- Wyoming and the Rocky Mountain ers are going to take a big hit." West. Barrasso announced Sept. 22 he =We have a lot to accomplish for was selected Vice Chairman of the the American people," Barrasso said Senate Republican Conference, the in a statement released last week number five Republican Party lead- about the new post. "We must end ership post in the Senate. The late wasteful Washington spending, stop Sen. Clif Hansen held the same po- flawed economic policies, make it sition in the 1970s, Barrasso said. easier for the private sector to create Barrasso said he was still getting jobs and secure a successful future acclimated to the new post Saturday for our country. and didn't comment on the respon- "This team is ready. The Amer- sibilities that come with the post, ican people are clearly ready. I'm but said, "I think it will be a good looking forward to the hard work opportunity to have an impact for and the challenges ahead of us." BYRON SCHOOL Continuedfrompagel security, and the business plan. Cook said he has dealt with Medi- care and Medicaid at his current men- tel health agency job and hls funding has =some wiggle room" to deal with the ebb and flow of MedicareYMedic- aid payments. The majority of peo- ple at the facility are expected to be court ordered, but Positive Progres- sions will also be able to bill insur- ance companies for private individu- als who use their services. Cook said his business plan has been looked over by his private investor, the school committee, Linda Harp and several others. Cook said he would be ti busi- ness' CEO and handle the upper lev- el management hiring. As for security, Cook said the fa- cility won't be taking violent offend- era and sex offenders and the facil- ity won't need a chain-link fence or guards. After discussing the issue for 1 1/2 hours in executive session, the board reconvened in an open session to offer leasing options on the district property to Cook. Crosby made a motion to grant the title of the home economics cot- tago to the Town of Byron in a first right of refusal agreement and to ne- gotiate a longterm lease with Posi- tive Progressions for the shop and green space (football field). Board chairman Dave Monk ex- plained to Cook that the district can- not give district property away for free but they would work with Cook to negotiate a lease agreement for the property. Crosby asked Cook why he needs to own the property to move forward. Cook said he doesn't want to invest a lot of money in construction if he doesn't own the land the building(s) sit on. "I'm not interested at all going that route," Cook said about leasing the property from the district. George brought up the idea of the district selling the property to the Town of Byron, which would then lease it to Cook. He said this idea would be favorable because then the town could help by writing grants and possibly utilizing town employees to help with maintenance and other work. George asked if the district would consider selling the land, either to the town or to Cook. Monk said the board would look at an unsolicited offer for any district property. Cook said be needs to move quick- ly on the project, hoping to break ground in as soon as two weeks to heat the frost. Board members said the School Facilities Commision has final say on the matter, and the SFC might take longer than two weeks to ap- prove the transfer of district prop- erty. Cook told the board he needs to make a move and if he cannot work out a deal with the school district to have the business in Byron, he would purchase land and build in Powell. "Our first choice is Byron. We would love to be in Byron," Cook said. =But we have to go to Powell if we can't make it go. We just have to move." The meeting ended without an agreement, with the possibility of Cook or the Town of Byron submit- ting an offer to the district for the property. Public acquires last piece of Devil's Canyon Ranch The Bureau of Land Management has acquired the final piece of the Devil's Canyon Ranch in the Big Horn Mountains to improve public access in the area, the BLM and The Trust for Public Land, announced this week. The BLM will add the 2,969-acre parcel to land it acquired earlier from TPL near Little Mountain, about 15 miles east of Lovell. The property will be managed as part of the Craig Thom- as Little Mountain Special Management Area, which is named after the late Sen. Craig Thomas (R-Wyo.), who was a strong supporter of the project. %Ve are so pleased that this final piece of the acqui- sition will now be complete," said BLM Cody Field Man- ager Mike Stewart. "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the vattLrai and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." TPL Project Manager Alex Diekmann said, =Fi- nally, we have ended one of the longest and most con- tontious fights over pub- lic access in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Devil's Canyon Ranch is a spectac- ular place and we are proud to have helped protect it for the public to enjoy." TPL acquired the ll,179-acre Devil's Canyon Ranch in 2003 and imme- diately sold 8,200 acres to BLM. The fmai sale com- pleted the transfer of the land to BLM, at a cost of $2 million. The money came from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), the federal gov- ernment's primary fund for preserving lands across the nation. The appraised fair market value for the 2,969 acxes was $3.4 million. Blake Henaing, Vice President of Lands and Conservation for the Rocky Mountain Elk Founda- tion, which contributed $100,000 in 2003 to help with the original acquisi- "The acquisition will improve public access to the area and ensure the protection of the natural and cultural resources found on Little Mountain." - BLM Cody Field Manager Mike Stewart tion, said, "RMEF is proud to have been a supporter and partner in this impor- tant conservation project in Wyoming. The access com- ponent as well as the tre- mendous wildlife benefits secured through this proj- ect will benefit future gen- erations of hunters and out- door recreationists.  The Devil's Canyon Ranch had been entirely surrounded by public hind, including the Medicine Wheel National Histor- ic Landmark, the Bighorn National Forest, and the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation A/a. Today's announcement ended a long dispute over access to more than 20,000 acres of state, BLM and Na- tionai Forest lands, which are used by sportsmen and outdoor enthusiasts. A road closure in 1998 blocked ac- cess, but the issue ended up in a federal court. Big Horn County Commission- era sued the ranch owners to gain access to the prop- envy, hilt ttlttmatoly lst thb case, leaving public acquisi- tion of the ranch as the only workable solution. TPL is a national non- profit organization that conserves land for people to eroy as parks, wilderness, and playgrounds. Since it was created in 1972, TPL has conserved more than 2.5 million acres in 47 states. TPL has Montana offices in Bozeman and Helena. Come on doom to Ladies Night at the Hen House Saturday, October 2[ Special Deals in EVERY Department all day long[ Hen House ... a great place for chicks 210 E. Main. Love, * 548-2077 Open Tues.- Sat.. 10am-7 pm