"
Newspaper Archive of
Lovell Chronicle
Lovell , Wyoming
Lyft
September 30, 2010     Lovell Chronicle
PAGE 13     (13 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 13     (13 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
September 30, 2010
 

Newspaper Archive of Lovell Chronicle produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2023. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




www.LovellChronicle.com September 30, 2010 I The Lovell Chronicle I 13 Big Horn County visit Massie stresses better quality of education for Wyoming students BY BOB RODRIGUEZ When it comes to the ed- ucation of Wyoming kinder- garten through 12th-grade students: "It's the kids, it's the kids, it's the kids -- all the rest is secondary." So stated Ninth District Sen. Mike Massie (D-Lara- mie) during a campaign fo- rum Thursday night, Sept. 23, at Lovell Middle School. Massie, 56, is seeking the job of state superinten- dent of public instruction. His Republican opponent, Cindy Hill, of Cheyenne, was unable to attend due to a schedule conflict, but has said that she will vis- it Big Horn County during October. She defeated cur- rent state superintendent Jim McBride in the prima- ry election. She or Massie will be elected in the Nov. 2 gener- al election. Massie spoke to an au- dience of approximately 20 persons, including sever- al educators from schools through the county. He was introduced by Dan Coe, su- perintendent of Big Horn County School District No. 2. Big Horn County news- man David Peck served as moderator, asking the can- didate numerous prepared questions regarding his platform. Massie, besides stress- ing throughout his hour- long talk that children -- and providing them quality, comprehensive education -- are his top priorities. He stated that the Wyoming Dept. of Public Instruction has enough money, spend- Wyoming candidate for supt. of public instruction Mike Massie, right, visits with (l-r) Greybull School Board members Jean Petty and Steve Hoblit and District No. 3 Supt. of Schools Roger Clark during his visit to Lovell last Thursday night. ing some $1 billion per year on K-12 students, but that there must be changes in how funding is applied to educational programs. He has been endorsed by Gov. Dave Freudenthal. Despite the funding, "one of the third-highest per-child levels in the na- tion, graduation rates are too low, the need for reme- dial work is too high and third-grade reading profi- ciency is dropping," Massie observed. Prior to his appearance, Massie had been shown around the county by state Rep. Elaine Harvey (R- "Teachers must perform well and spend as much time as possible with students." Mike Massie candidate for SupL of Public |nruciion Lovell). The candidate, while serving in the state leg- islature during the past 16 years, said that he has worked to pass key educa- tional bills, including the Hathaway Scholarship Pro- gram. It rewards eligible Wyoming students with scholarships to the Univer- sity of Wyoming or a Wyo- ming community college. Massie, a former teach- er, said that he ties the success of the state and its students with "quality edu- cation to provide them the knowledge and skills to go anywhere they choose after graduation," whether they opt for vocational educa- tion, the military or higher education. Among his major cam- paign planks: *He will "not sit behind a desk in Cheyenne, but vis- it all 48 public school dis- tricts. More parents need to be involved in their chil- dren's education." *"Teachers must per- form well and spend as much time as possible with students." He believes that the PAWS (Proficiency As- sessments for Wyoming Students) "should be elim- inated in favor of one that provides useful information about student learning and doesn't take up too much classroom time." *He would reject fed- eral funding "if too many strings are attached," and believes that school district boards should be allowed to set policies unfettered by government intervention. *He would strive con- stantly to foster communi- ty involvement, especially parents, as well as commu- nity and business leaders, in the patterns of educa- tion. The public instruction department has become un- involved with communities, and he will change that, he stated. "We will all decide matters together," he said. *Massie added that he "strongly supports arts and music" education. "Math and language skills must also be strengthened," he said, and "an array of voca- tional education is needed in high schools, as well as the funding for it." The candidate conclud- ed his presentation with the comment that what is most important to him is, "The education of our kids, their welfare for their best inter- ests by providing the best education. Those are criti- cal. 'We can have the best educational program in the nation, and we can make Wyoming a leader. But we can't be a great state with- out great education." Write-in gubernatorial candidate Haynes stands on Constitution, states' dghts BY DAVID PECK A dedication to the U.S. Constitution and to restor- ing states' rights has led conservative Taylor Haynes to seek the office of gover- nor of Wyoming in the 2010 General Election as a write- in candidate. Haynes, a Cheyenne physician and a member of the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees, original- ly planned to be on the gen- eral election ballot as an In- dependent, but he fell a few signatures short on a peti- tion drive to join the bal- lot and decided to run as a write-in instead. He spoke in Lovell last Wednesday, Sept. 22, be- fore a gathering of support- ers and interested citizens at the Lovell Community Center. "We don't have govern- ment by the people, we have government for the people and of the people," Haynes said in criticizing how gov- ernment operates today. In introductory re- marks, Haynes spoke about his upbringing on a produce farm in Louisiana and his education and career, first earning a mechanical engi- neering degree and working in Salt Lake City for Ken- necott Copper, then earn- ing a degree in medicine from the University of Utah and his subsequent career as a urologist practicing in Cheyenne. Haynes called himself "a cowboy at heart" and noted that he not only ran his medical practice for 14 years but has ranched for 26 years, owning and op- erating the Thunder Ba- sin Land, Livestock and Investment Co. He and his wife, Beth, also own Moun- tain Benefit Associates, a third-party administrator of health benefits, located in Worland. He is not pleased with the way government is operating today, noting, "We've been attacked as small businessmen, Chris- tians and conservatives. We're not entitled to enjoy the fruits of our labors." Haynes said he has an obligation to run as a con- stitutional candidate with Ron Micheli falling in the Republican Primary. He said he used to be a regis- tered Republican but is now DAVm PECK Conservative write-in candidate for governor Taylor Haynes speaks to an interested audience at the Lovell Community Center last Wednesday, Sept. 22. an Independent. He said he didn't run in the Republican Primary because he didn't want to split Micheli's votes but he said he is unlikely to cost GOP nominee Matt Mead a victory in Novem- ber because of the huge reg- istration advantage Repub- licans enjoy in Wyoming. If elected governor, Haynes said, he would faith- fully exercise his constitu- tional authority to manage the State of Wyoming and enforce the statutes that give him the authority to do SO. Taking questions from the audience, Haynes said he would assert state control of lands in Wyoming, tak- ing over land management duties from the BLM, For- est Service, Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and other federal agencies. He said he would convene a constitutional seminar in Cheyenne and educate Wyoming's top elected of- ficials, legislative leaders, county commissioners and county sheriffs about Wy- oming's rights under the Constitution. He said he would prosecute those who violate their oath to uphold the Constitution. "This isn't some game," he said. "This is for our country. The prospect that they can be recalled will change their behavior." He said legislation is being crafted to create a re- call statute to hold elected officials accountable, and he said the same standard would apply to him "if I turn out to be a charlatan," adding, "A recall statute gives us government by the people." A member of the au- dience said that Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 of the Constitution states that the federal government is not allowed to own land except land to place a capitol. All other federal land is illegal, he said. Asked about how he came to his principles, Haynes said he has seen the power of the Constitu- tion in his personal life and said it has held the nation together in times of crisis, calling the document "di- vinely inspired." "There are no excuses for not doing well except for not trying," he said. "We must accept the responsi- bilities that go with these blessings...We can have violent disagreements, but the republic lives. We have to have the Constitution as the centerpiece." Haynes said Wyoming must be very wary of Unit- ed Nations gaining greater influence in Yellowstone National Park through the Biosphere Reserve Program and called the Endangered Species Act "an unconstitu- tional federal mandate." He said he was initially named to the recovery team for the Preble's meadow jump- ing mouse, but after he read and pointed out that the federal government's own documents stated the mouse was not endangered or didn't exist as a sepa- rate sub-species from other similar mice, he was told his "services were no longer needed." He said he's not against research being conducted in Yellowstone, "but if the UN thinks it has some claim, I cannot let that go." Haynes said the Endan- gered Species Act should be declared "null and void," and he would have county sheriffs back up the state government and its posi- tion. "We may have to arrest some people," he said. Turning to education, Haynes said he would com- pletely restructure the Wyoming school system, moving to a voucher sys- tem whereby parents could choose from among private companies that would run the school system. He said no additional money would be needed except to main- tain buildings. He also said he believes in developing a strong voca- tional education program in schools and said schools are losing a lot of talented kids through a cookie-cutter ap- proach to education. "Drop-outs are not done, they're bored," he said. "We need to serve that need and put them on the right path. A student could become the next Bill Gates or the next Henry Ford." THINKING ABOUT BUYING A BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY? The Lovell Chronicle and the Federal Trade Commission, the nation's consumer protection agency, say investigate before you invest. Visit ftc.gov/bixopps to learn how to tell a real deal from a raw deal. "1 won't lobby the legislature, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. Taylor Haynes candidate for Governor Fears about health care reform are well founded, Haynes said, but he said the bill wasn't really about health care, it was about government's attempt to "control every aspect of your lives." He said he would use the Nullification Act to re- verse federal legislation that adversely affects Wyoming. "As governor I can't write it (legislation), but I can lead the charge," he said. "I won't lobby the leg- islature, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. We'll have discussions in commu- nities across the state." There are problems with America's health care sys- tem, Haynes said, but what works for California or Colo- rado won't necessarily work for Wyoming. '%Ve'll propose a solu- tion that will fit Wyoming," he said. "we'll wash our own laundry." When it comes to a vari- ety of programs from health care to welfare, Haynes said that when Wyoming starts to do its own thing, the fed- eral government will "pull the money out," but Wyo- ming could continue to fund necessary programs by tak- ing 100 percent of severance taxes and mineral royalty money and keeping it in Wy- oming. "As I understand it, we collect the funds and send them to Washington," he said. "We would collect it and keep it. And if we don't collect it (currently), compa- nies will pay mineral royal- ties here or they're done. "I'm open to suggestions. We must be direct. That's the only way to do it. We need to take control of our resources and keep it here. "If laws are illegal, we don't have to obey them, but citizens cannot do it alone. The governor needs to stand up. We have not had a gov- ernor stand up with his citi- zens. It's not as difficult as people think. Unless the governor does that, the people are lost...If people will stand behind me, I will make these things stick. If I'm elected governor I'm not going to back down. That's why we'll need the sheriffs to get the federal agencies to stand down." HOT SPRINGS CONVENTION OENTER HOT SPRINGS STATE PARK Thermopolls, Wyoming I TWO-NIGHT PACKAGE $199 99.00\\;s209 99.0 / Amvin Sun:Thurs. [Nil COUple Arfivin8 / (any 2 nights) Fri. or Sat. Tlxca nc includL'4 gtt* Illb'l to chanFlllil] ev and bllck trot &Us lpl (]o0d tbrl d2Yd 201 t Two Nights Lodging Bottle of Champagne Prime Rib Dinner for Two Daily Continental Breakfast Buffet Outdoor Hot Mineral Jacuzzi Kids Stay Free And Much, Much More! Call for details. (307) 864-3131 1-800-DaysInn www.thermopolisdaysinn.eom Test Your Home Today for Radonl Radon is a cancer-causing radioac- tive gas that you can't see, smell or taste. Exposure may increase your risk of lung cancer. Order a test kit today at wyoming.radon.com or call 3o7-777-6o15 for more information. Wyoming Department of Health Commit to your health, www.LovellChronicle.com September 30, 2010 I The Lovell Chronicle I 13 Big Horn County visit Massie stresses better quality of education for Wyoming students BY BOB RODRIGUEZ When it comes to the ed- ucation of Wyoming kinder- garten through 12th-grade students: "It's the kids, it's the kids, it's the kids -- all the rest is secondary." So stated Ninth District Sen. Mike Massie (D-Lara- mie) during a campaign fo- rum Thursday night, Sept. 23, at Lovell Middle School. Massie, 56, is seeking the job of state superinten- dent of public instruction. His Republican opponent, Cindy Hill, of Cheyenne, was unable to attend due to a schedule conflict, but has said that she will vis- it Big Horn County during October. She defeated cur- rent state superintendent Jim McBride in the prima- ry election. She or Massie will be elected in the Nov. 2 gener- al election. Massie spoke to an au- dience of approximately 20 persons, including sever- al educators from schools through the county. He was introduced by Dan Coe, su- perintendent of Big Horn County School District No. 2. Big Horn County news- man David Peck served as moderator, asking the can- didate numerous prepared questions regarding his platform. Massie, besides stress- ing throughout his hour- long talk that children -- and providing them quality, comprehensive education -- are his top priorities. He stated that the Wyoming Dept. of Public Instruction has enough money, spend- Wyoming candidate for supt. of public instruction Mike Massie, right, visits with (l-r) Greybull School Board members Jean Petty and Steve Hoblit and District No. 3 Supt. of Schools Roger Clark during his visit to Lovell last Thursday night. ing some $1 billion per year on K-12 students, but that there must be changes in how funding is applied to educational programs. He has been endorsed by Gov. Dave Freudenthal. Despite the funding, "one of the third-highest per-child levels in the na- tion, graduation rates are too low, the need for reme- dial work is too high and third-grade reading profi- ciency is dropping," Massie observed. Prior to his appearance, Massie had been shown around the county by state Rep. Elaine Harvey (R- "Teachers must perform well and spend as much time as possible with students." Mike Massie candidate for SupL of Public |nruciion Lovell). The candidate, while serving in the state leg- islature during the past 16 years, said that he has worked to pass key educa- tional bills, including the Hathaway Scholarship Pro- gram. It rewards eligible Wyoming students with scholarships to the Univer- sity of Wyoming or a Wyo- ming community college. Massie, a former teach- er, said that he ties the success of the state and its students with "quality edu- cation to provide them the knowledge and skills to go anywhere they choose after graduation," whether they opt for vocational educa- tion, the military or higher education. Among his major cam- paign planks: *He will "not sit behind a desk in Cheyenne, but vis- it all 48 public school dis- tricts. More parents need to be involved in their chil- dren's education." *"Teachers must per- form well and spend as much time as possible with students." He believes that the PAWS (Proficiency As- sessments for Wyoming Students) "should be elim- inated in favor of one that provides useful information about student learning and doesn't take up too much classroom time." *He would reject fed- eral funding "if too many strings are attached," and believes that school district boards should be allowed to set policies unfettered by government intervention. *He would strive con- stantly to foster communi- ty involvement, especially parents, as well as commu- nity and business leaders, in the patterns of educa- tion. The public instruction department has become un- involved with communities, and he will change that, he stated. "We will all decide matters together," he said. *Massie added that he "strongly supports arts and music" education. "Math and language skills must also be strengthened," he said, and "an array of voca- tional education is needed in high schools, as well as the funding for it." The candidate conclud- ed his presentation with the comment that what is most important to him is, "The education of our kids, their welfare for their best inter- ests by providing the best education. Those are criti- cal. 'We can have the best educational program in the nation, and we can make Wyoming a leader. But we can't be a great state with- out great education." Write-in gubernatorial candidate Haynes stands on Constitution, states' dghts BY DAVID PECK A dedication to the U.S. Constitution and to restor- ing states' rights has led conservative Taylor Haynes to seek the office of gover- nor of Wyoming in the 2010 General Election as a write- in candidate. Haynes, a Cheyenne physician and a member of the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees, original- ly planned to be on the gen- eral election ballot as an In- dependent, but he fell a few signatures short on a peti- tion drive to join the bal- lot and decided to run as a write-in instead. He spoke in Lovell last Wednesday, Sept. 22, be- fore a gathering of support- ers and interested citizens at the Lovell Community Center. "We don't have govern- ment by the people, we have government for the people and of the people," Haynes said in criticizing how gov- ernment operates today. In introductory re- marks, Haynes spoke about his upbringing on a produce farm in Louisiana and his education and career, first earning a mechanical engi- neering degree and working in Salt Lake City for Ken- necott Copper, then earn- ing a degree in medicine from the University of Utah and his subsequent career as a urologist practicing in Cheyenne. Haynes called himself "a cowboy at heart" and noted that he not only ran his medical practice for 14 years but has ranched for 26 years, owning and op- erating the Thunder Ba- sin Land, Livestock and Investment Co. He and his wife, Beth, also own Moun- tain Benefit Associates, a third-party administrator of health benefits, located in Worland. He is not pleased with the way government is operating today, noting, "We've been attacked as small businessmen, Chris- tians and conservatives. We're not entitled to enjoy the fruits of our labors." Haynes said he has an obligation to run as a con- stitutional candidate with Ron Micheli falling in the Republican Primary. He said he used to be a regis- tered Republican but is now DAVm PECK Conservative write-in candidate for governor Taylor Haynes speaks to an interested audience at the Lovell Community Center last Wednesday, Sept. 22. an Independent. He said he didn't run in the Republican Primary because he didn't want to split Micheli's votes but he said he is unlikely to cost GOP nominee Matt Mead a victory in Novem- ber because of the huge reg- istration advantage Repub- licans enjoy in Wyoming. If elected governor, Haynes said, he would faith- fully exercise his constitu- tional authority to manage the State of Wyoming and enforce the statutes that give him the authority to do SO. Taking questions from the audience, Haynes said he would assert state control of lands in Wyoming, tak- ing over land management duties from the BLM, For- est Service, Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and other federal agencies. He said he would convene a constitutional seminar in Cheyenne and educate Wyoming's top elected of- ficials, legislative leaders, county commissioners and county sheriffs about Wy- oming's rights under the Constitution. He said he would prosecute those who violate their oath to uphold the Constitution. "This isn't some game," he said. "This is for our country. The prospect that they can be recalled will change their behavior." He said legislation is being crafted to create a re- call statute to hold elected officials accountable, and he said the same standard would apply to him "if I turn out to be a charlatan," adding, "A recall statute gives us government by the people." A member of the au- dience said that Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 of the Constitution states that the federal government is not allowed to own land except land to place a capitol. All other federal land is illegal, he said. Asked about how he came to his principles, Haynes said he has seen the power of the Constitu- tion in his personal life and said it has held the nation together in times of crisis, calling the document "di- vinely inspired." "There are no excuses for not doing well except for not trying," he said. "We must accept the responsi- bilities that go with these blessings...We can have violent disagreements, but the republic lives. We have to have the Constitution as the centerpiece." Haynes said Wyoming must be very wary of Unit- ed Nations gaining greater influence in Yellowstone National Park through the Biosphere Reserve Program and called the Endangered Species Act "an unconstitu- tional federal mandate." He said he was initially named to the recovery team for the Preble's meadow jump- ing mouse, but after he read and pointed out that the federal government's own documents stated the mouse was not endangered or didn't exist as a sepa- rate sub-species from other similar mice, he was told his "services were no longer needed." He said he's not against research being conducted in Yellowstone, "but if the UN thinks it has some claim, I cannot let that go." Haynes said the Endan- gered Species Act should be declared "null and void," and he would have county sheriffs back up the state government and its posi- tion. "We may have to arrest some people," he said. Turning to education, Haynes said he would com- pletely restructure the Wyoming school system, moving to a voucher sys- tem whereby parents could choose from among private companies that would run the school system. He said no additional money would be needed except to main- tain buildings. He also said he believes in developing a strong voca- tional education program in schools and said schools are losing a lot of talented kids through a cookie-cutter ap- proach to education. "Drop-outs are not done, they're bored," he said. "We need to serve that need and put them on the right path. A student could become the next Bill Gates or the next Henry Ford." THINKING ABOUT BUYING A BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY? The Lovell Chronicle and the Federal Trade Commission, the nation's consumer protection agency, say investigate before you invest. Visit ftc.gov/bixopps to learn how to tell a real deal from a raw deal. "1 won't lobby the legislature, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. Taylor Haynes candidate for Governor Fears about health care reform are well founded, Haynes said, but he said the bill wasn't really about health care, it was about government's attempt to "control every aspect of your lives." He said he would use the Nullification Act to re- verse federal legislation that adversely affects Wyoming. "As governor I can't write it (legislation), but I can lead the charge," he said. "I won't lobby the leg- islature, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. We'll have discussions in commu- nities across the state." There are problems with America's health care sys- tem, Haynes said, but what works for California or Colo- rado won't necessarily work for Wyoming. '%Ve'll propose a solu- tion that will fit Wyoming," he said. "we'll wash our own laundry." When it comes to a vari- ety of programs from health care to welfare, Haynes said that when Wyoming starts to do its own thing, the fed- eral government will "pull the money out," but Wyo- ming could continue to fund necessary programs by tak- ing 100 percent of severance taxes and mineral royalty money and keeping it in Wy- oming. "As I understand it, we collect the funds and send them to Washington," he said. "We would collect it and keep it. And if we don't collect it (currently), compa- nies will pay mineral royal- ties here or they're done. "I'm open to suggestions. We must be direct. That's the only way to do it. We need to take control of our resources and keep it here. "If laws are illegal, we don't have to obey them, but citizens cannot do it alone. The governor needs to stand up. We have not had a gov- ernor stand up with his citi- zens. It's not as difficult as people think. Unless the governor does that, the people are lost...If people will stand behind me, I will make these things stick. If I'm elected governor I'm not going to back down. That's why we'll need the sheriffs to get the federal agencies to stand down." HOT SPRINGS CONVENTION OENTER HOT SPRINGS STATE PARK Thermopolls, Wyoming I TWO-NIGHT PACKAGE $199 99.00\\;s209 99.0 / Amvin Sun:Thurs. [Nil COUple Arfivin8 / (any 2 nights) Fri. or Sat. Tlxca nc includL'4 gtt* Illb'l to chanFlllil] ev and bllck trot &Us lpl (]o0d tbrl d2Yd 201 t Two Nights Lodging Bottle of Champagne Prime Rib Dinner for Two Daily Continental Breakfast Buffet Outdoor Hot Mineral Jacuzzi Kids Stay Free And Much, Much More! Call for details. (307) 864-3131 1-800-DaysInn www.thermopolisdaysinn.eom Test Your Home Today for Radonl Radon is a cancer-causing radioac- tive gas that you can't see, smell or taste. Exposure may increase your risk of lung cancer. Order a test kit today at wyoming.radon.com or call 3o7-777-6o15 for more information. Wyoming Department of Health Commit to your health, www.LovellChronicle.com September 30, 2010 I The Lovell Chronicle 113 Big Horn County visit Massie stresses better quality of education for Wyoming students BY BOB RODRIGUEZ the PAWS (Proficiency As- Whenit comes to the ed- sessmente for Wyoming ucation of Wyeming kinder- Students) "should be elim- gotten through 12th-grade inated in favor of one that students: "It's the kids, it's provides useful information the kids, it's the kids -- all about student learning and the rest is secondary." doesn't take up too much So stated Ninth District classroom time." Sen. Mike Massie (D-Lara- *He would reject fed- mie) during a campaign fo- eral funding "if too many rum Thursday night, Sept. strings are attached," and 28, at Lovell Middle School. believes that school district Masale, 56, is seeking the boards should be allowed to job of state superinten- set policies unfettered by dent of public instruction, government intervention. His Republican opponent, *He would strive con- Cindy Hill, of Cheyenne, stanfly to foster commtmi- was unable to attend due ty involvement, especially to a schedule conflict, but parents, as well as commu- has said that she will vis- laity and business leaders, it Big Horn County during in the patterns of educa- October. She defeated cur- tion. The public instruction rent state superintendent department has become un- Jim McBride in the prima- involved with communities, ry election, and he will change that, he She or Masdie will be stated. %Ve will all decide elected in the Nov. 2 gener- Wyoming eandldate for supt. of public instrmctinn Mike Masale, right, visits with (l-r} Greyhttll School matters together," he said. ul election. *Massie added that he Massie spoke to an au- Board members Jean Petty and Steve Hobfit and District No. 3 Supt. of Schools Roger Clark during his "strongly supports arts and dience of approximately 20 visit to Lovell last Thursday night, music" education. "Math persons, including sever- and language skills must al educators from schools ing some $1 billion per year students with "quality edu- also be strengthened,  he through the county. He was on K-12 students, but that cation to provide them the said, and "an array of voca- introduced by Dan Gee, su- there must be changes in knowledge and skills to go tional education is needed perintendent of Big Hem how funding is applied to "Teachers must ori1n weli anywhere they choose after in high schools, as well as County School District No. educational programs. He and spend =is much tilne ss graduation," whether they the funding for it." 2. Big Horn County news- has been endorsed by Gov. opt for vocational educa- The candidate conclud- man David Peck served as Dave Freudenthdi. possible with students." tion, the military or higher ed his presentation with the moderator, asking the can- Despite the funding, Mike Massie education, comment that what is most didate numerous prepared "one of the third-highest candidate for Supt. of Public Instruction Among his major cam- important to him is, "The questions regarding his per-child levels in the no- paign planks: education of our kids, their platform, lion, graduation rates are *He will "not sit behind welfare for their best inter- Massie, besides stress- too low, the need for reme- a desk in Cheyenne, but vis- ests by providing the best ing throughout his hour- dial work is too high and Lovefl). gram. It rewards eligible it all 48 public school dis- education. Those are criti- long talk that children -- third-grade reading profi- The candidate, while Wyoming students with tricts. More parents need cal. and providing them quality, ciency is dropping," Massie serving in the state leg- scholarships to the Univer- to be involved in their cbJl- "We can have the best comprehensive education observed, ialature during the past sity of Wyoming or a Wyo- dren's education." educational program in the -- are his top priorities. He prior to his appearance, 16 years, said that he has ming community college. *"Teachers must per- nation, and we can make stated that the Wyoming Masale had been shown worked to pass key eduea- Massie, a former teach- form well and spend as Wyoming a leader. But we Dept. of Public Instruction around the county by state tionai bills, including the er, said that he ties the much time as possible with can't be a great state with- has enough money, spend- Rep. Elaine Harvey (R- Hathaway Scholarship Pro- success of the state and its students." He believes that out great education." Write-in gubernatorial candidate Haynes stands on Constitution, states' fights BY DAVID PECK A dedication to the U.S. Constitution and to restor- ing states' rights has led conservative Taylor Haynes to seek the office of gover- nor of Wyoming in the 2010 General Election as a write- in candidate. Haynes, a Cheyenne physician and a member of the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees, original- ly planned to be on the gen- eral election ballot as an In- dependent, but he fell a few signatures short on a peti- tion drive to join the bal- lot and decided to run as a write-in instead. He spoke in Lovell last Wednesday, Sept. 22, be- fore a gathering of support- ers and interested citizens at the Lovell Community Center. "We don't have govern- ment by the people, we have government for the people and of the people," Haynes said in criticizing how gov- ernment operates today. In introductory re- marks, Haynes spoke about his upbringing on a produce farm in Louisiana and his education and career, first earning a mechanical engi- neering degree and working in Salt Lake City for Ken- necott Copper, then earn- ing a degree in medicine from the University of Utah and his subsequent career as a urologist practicing in Cheyenne. Haynes called himself "a cowboy at heart" and noted that he not only ran his medical practice for 14 years but has ranched for 26 years, owning and op- erating the Thunder Ba- sin Land, Livestock and Investment Co. He and his wife, Beth, also own Moun- tain Benefit Associates, a third-party administrator of health benefits, located in Worland. He is not pleased with the way government is operating today, noting, "We've been attacked as small businessmen, Chris- tians and conservatives. We're not entitled to enjoy the fruits of our labors." Haynes said he has an obligation to run as a con- stitutional candidate with Ron Micheli falling in the Republican Primary. He said he used to be a regis- tared Republican but is now !!il DAVm I Conservative write-in candidate for governor Taylor Haynes speaks to an interested audience at the LoveB Community Center last Wednesday, Sept. 22. an Independent. He said he didn't run in the Republican Primary because he didn't want to split Micheli's votes but he said he is unlikely to cost GOP nominee Matt Mead a victory in Novem- ber because of the huge reg- istration advantage Repub- licans enjoy in Wyoming. If elected governor, Haynes said, he would faith- fully exercise his constitu- tional authority to manage the State of Wyoming and enforce the statutes that give him the authority to do so. Taking questions from the audience, Haynes said he would assert state control of lands in Wyoming, tak- ing over land management duties from the BLM, For- est Service, Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service and other federal agencies. He said he would convene a constitutional seminar in Cheyenne and educate Wyoming's top elected of_ ficials, legislative leaders, county commissioners and county sheriffs about Wy- oming% rights under the Constitution. He said he would prosecute those who violate their oath to uphold the Constitution. "This isn't some game," he said. "This is for our they can be recalled will change their behavior." He said legislation is being crafted to create a re- call statute to hold elected officials accountable, and he said the same standard would apply to him "ff I turn out to be a charlatan," adding, "A recall statute gives us government by the people." A member of the au- dience said that Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 of the Constitution states that the federal gewrnment is not allowed to own land except land to place a capitol. All other federal land is illegal, he said. Asked about how he came to his principles, Haynes said he has seen the power of the Constitu- tion in his personal life and said it has held the nation together in times of crisis, calling the document =di- vhiely inspired." "There are no excuses for not doing well except for not trying," he said. %Ve must accept the responsi- bilities that go with these blessings...We can have violent disagreements, but the republic lives. We have to have the Constitution as the centerpiece." Haynes said Wyoming country. The prospect that must be very wary of Unit- ed Nations gaining greater influence m Yellowstone National Park through the Biosphere Reserve Program and called the Endangered Species Act "an unconstitu- tional federal mandate." He said he was initially named to the recovery team for the Preble's meadow jump- ing mouse, but after he read and pointed out that the federal government's own documents stated the mouse was not endangered or didn't exist as a sepa- rate sub-species from other similar mice, he was told his "services were no longer needed." He said he's not against research being conducted in Yellowstone, "but if the UN thinks it has some claim, I cannot let that go." Haynes said the Endan- gered Species Act should be declared "null and void," and he would have county sheriffs back up the state government and its posi- tion. "We may have to rest some people," he said. Turning to education, Haynes said he would com- pletely restructure the Wyoming school system, moving to a voucher sys- tem whereby parents could choose from among private companies that would run the school system. He said no additions] money would be needed except to main- tain buildings. He also said he believes in developing a strong voca- tional education program in schools and said schools are losing a lot of talented kids through a cookie-cutter ap- proach to education. "Drop-outo are not done, they're bored," he said. "We need to serve that need and put them on the right path. A student could become the next Bill Gates or the next Henry Ford." THINKING ABOUT BUYING A BUSINESS OPPORTUNTTY? The Loveg Chrordele ad the Federal Trade Commission, the nstlon's consumer protectlon agency, ssy investigate before you invest. Vis fte.gov/btxopps to learn how to tell e, real deal from a rs, w deal. "1 won't lobby the legislature, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. Taylor Haynes candidale for Governor Fears about health care reform are well founded, Haynes said, but he said the bill wasn't really about health care, it was about government's attempt to "control every aspect ofyeur lives." He said he would use the Nullification Act to re- verse federal legislation that adversely affects Wyoming. "As governor I can't write it (legislation), but I can lead the charge," he said. "I won't lobby the leg- Jointure, I'll lobby the people who elect legislators. We'll have discussions in commu- nities across the state." There are problems with America's health care sys- tem, Haynes said, but what works for California or Colo- rado won't necessarily work for Wyoming. "We'll propose a solu- tion that will fit Wyoming," he said. "We'll wash our own laundry." When it comes to a vari- ety of programs from health care to welfare, Haynes said that when Wyoming starts to do its own thing, the fed- eral government will "pull the money out," but Wyo- ming could continue to fund necessary programs by tak- ing 100 percent of severance taxes and mineral royalty money and keeping it in Wy- oming. "As I understand it, we collect the funds and send them to Washington," he said. "We would collect it and keep it. And if we don't collect it (currently), compa- nies will pay mineral royal- ties here or they're done. "I'm open to suggestions. We must be direct. That's the only way to do it. We need to take control of our resources and keep it here. "If laws are illegal, we don't have to obey them, but citizens cannot do it alone. The governor needs to stand up. We have not had a gov- ernor stand up with his citi- zens. It's not as difficult as people think. Unless the governor does that, the people are lost...If people will stand behind me, I will make these things stick. If I'm elected governor I'm not going to back down. That's why we'll need the sheriffs to get the federal agencies to stand down2 HOT m0$ OONVEBrrto IEI'(A T SpNNGS srA K TWO-NIGHT PACKAGE $199:'209 .o NitLoagm= saa of Chame me m b .nar for Two * Daily ContinentM Bakfa Bt OuLdr HOt Mineral/acuzzi Kd, Sy Fe A Much Much Ma Ca" for aats (307) 864-3131 1-80O-DaysInn Test Your Home Today for Rodonl Radon is a cancer-causing radioac- o% tive gas that you can't see, smell or fo taste. Exposure may increase your risk of lung cancer. Order a test kit Wyoming today at wvoming.radon,c0m or call Department 3o7-777-6o15 for more information, of Health