"
Newspaper Archive of
Lovell Chronicle
Lovell , Wyoming
Lyft
November 22, 2012     Lovell Chronicle
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 22, 2012
 

Newspaper Archive of Lovell Chronicle produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2023. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




4 I The Lovell Chronicle I November 22, 2012 CHRONICLE tIHIOHS Thanksgiving and unity in the words of Lincoln President Abraham Lincoln is in the minds of many Americans these days with the release of the new Steverl Spielberg movie "Lincoln." And so since we are celebrating Thanksgiving this week, we thought it might be appropri- ate to look back to the time in 1863 when Lincoln officially proclaimed Thanksgiving as a national holiday. Until 1863, states scheduled their own Thanksgiving celebrations at different times, but Sarah J. Hale, an editor for the popular women magazine "GodeyL Lady Journal" wrote to Lincoln on Sept. 28, 1863, urging him to issue a proclamation, saying a national day of Thanksgiving would establish "a great Union Festival of America." Of course, the U.S. was in the throes of the Civil War, so Lincoln was no doubt looking for something that could uni- fy the nation. With our nation somewhat divided in this day and age, his words issued on Oct. 3, 1863, ring true today: By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The year that is drawing toward its close has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, oth- ers have been added, which are of so extraordinary a na- ture that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever-watchful provi- dence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign states to invite and provoke their aggressions, peace has been pre- served with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere, except in the theater of military con- flict; while that theater has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful indu.stry.o the national defense have not arrested the plow, the shuttle, or the ship; the ax has enlarged the borders oPoJ settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege, and the battlefield, and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised, nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently, and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American people. I do, therefore, invite my fellow-citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next as a Day of Thanksgiv- ing and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the heavens. And I recommend to them that, while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliv- erances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, or- phans, mourners, or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty hand to heal the wounds of the nation, and to restore it, as soon as may be con- sistent with the Divine purposes, to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility, and union. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United Stated States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this third day of Octo- ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln i'M NOTTHI00 KINl> OF HOUSEWIFI00 PREPARES A HUGE TURKEY PlNNER--THI00N WAITS FOR EVERYONE TO SHOW UP... .. I WAITTILL EVERYONE SHOWS BEFORE ! BEGIN PREPARING! How did people vote? The religious breakdown America's voters are overwhelming- ly Christian: 78 percent of voters identi- fied themselves as Christians in exit polls Nov. 6. That is down just 3 percent from 81 percent, the highest Christian partic- ipation in the previous three elections. Despite some of the pre-election rhetoric about the nation being overrun by non-be- lievers of various stripes, this obviously did not happen. Of the remaining 22 percent of voters, 9 percent followed other religions, such as Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Is- lam. Twelve percent fell into the "unaffil- iated" category, which includes atheists and agnostics, but primarily consists of people who are religious but did not choose to iden- tify themselves with a particular religion. Further study of this information from polls conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion and Pub- lic Life reveals several important conclusions. First, white evangelical Protestant voters con- tinue to punch above their weight. Even though they make up only 19 percent of the nation's popu- lation, they accounted for 23 percent of the voters. The same held true for mainline Protestants, al- though to a lesser degree; their 15 percent of the population resulted in 16 percent of the electorate. Both Protestant groups voted for Romney, the evangelicals by a margin of almost 4-to-1. Despite theological misgivings about Romney's Mormon- ism, they actually gave him a higher percentage of their vote than they did to McCain four years ear- lier. This also was a point higher than he gained among the Mormon population. Second, white Catholics voted for Romney in percentages similar to mainline Protestants. While mainline Protestants preferred Romney 55 percent to 44 percent, white Catholics voted for him by a margin of 59 percent to 40 percent. Third, minority religious voters favored Obama. More than 75 percent of Hispanic Cath- olics voted for Obama, while 95 percent of black Protestants did so. Together, they accounted for 14 percent of the electorate, compared to 61 percent of the white Christian vote. Nothing is particularly surprising in these numbers. They are similar to the voting preferenc- es for Republican and Democratic candidates in the previous three elections. One religious trend within the country's popu- Paul P.M. nesher Religion Today lation did not play out as expected. The role organized religion plays among the U.S. population has been decreasing. This year, for the first time, the num- ber of people who reDo themselves as unaffiliated with : hfi 'Y]gion has 'hit 20 percent, according tq pew's pollsters. While this group went overwhelming- ly for Obama, they did not actually vote in large numbers. They made up only 12 percent of the voters on election day. This poor turnout indicates that neither party is addressing their concerns. A third of young people (ages 18-28) belong to the unaffiliated crowd, those who check the "none of the above" box when it comes to religious identity. Many pundits have identified this as a problem for the Republi- can Party, fearing that this identification will con- tinue as these voters get older. This will probably not be the case. College-age people, as a group, al- ways rebel against their parents when they leave home, and dropping out of church is part of that. When they marry and have children, they tend to join churches and other religious institutions again. The real problem for the Republican Party is its identification with religious policies and views that are insensitive to women. The reopening of the debate over reproductive matters has alienated many female voters. The suggestion that workers at religious institutions should have fewer health- care rights than those employed at other business- es does not sit well with many women. Similarly, the views on rape expressed in religious terms by some male Republican candidates further dam- aged the party's image among women. In the end, it seems that people largely voted for the party that made them feel welcome. Repub- licans attracted those who were white, Christian and male, winning their votes by large numbers. Democrats attracted majorities among those vot- ers who did not belong to all three of these catego- ries. Add these results to the roughly 40 percent of the white male Christians who voted for Obama, and that explains the election's outcome. Flesher is director of UW's Religious Stud- ies Program. Past columns and more information about the program can be found on the web at www.uwyo.edu/RelStds. To comment on this col- umn, visit http://religion-today.blogspot.com. The Lovell Chronicle welcomes letters from its readers and will make every effort to print them. Letters longer than 400 words may not be printed. Letters must be signed and in- clude the address and telephone number of the writer. Unsigned letters will be discarded. Writers are limited to two letters in any 30 day period. All letters must conform to the law of libel and be in good taste. They may be mailed to The Lovell Chronicle, Box 787, Lovell, WY 82431, or delivered to our office at 234 E. Main St., Lovell. A strict 1:00 p.m. Tuesday deadline will be enforced. USPS 321-060 234 E. Main, Lovell, Wyoming 82431 307.548.22170 FAX 307.548-2218 Emaih lcnews@tctwest.net David Peck, Editor and Publisher Editor .......... . ...................................................................... David Peck Reporter ........................................................................ Patti Carpenter Office Manager ........................................................... Gladys McNeil Production Manager ........................................................... Pat Panner Advertising Manager ................................................ Stormy Jameson Staff ................................................. Dorothy Nelson, Marwyn Layne Jason Zeller, Teressa Ennis, Mike Kitchen, Cheryl Jolley 00C'00v0000icle HI'OH Publi!" weekly on Thursday at Lovell, Wyoming Periodicals Postage paid at Lovell, WY SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 1 year in Big Horn and Park counties ...................................... $28.00 1 year in Wyoming ................................................................... $40,00 1 Year out-of-Wyoming ........................................................... $45.00 Single Copy ................................................................................... 75 E-Mail: lcnews@tctwest,net, Website: www, lovellchronicle,com MEMBER: National Newspaper Association Wyoming Press Association 2912 MEMBER 2011 AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER Postmaster, Send Address Changes to: The Lovell Chronicle, 234 E, Main St,, Lovell, WY 82431  I